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Is there any association between dietary patterns, food security status and psychiatric disorders among Iranian earthquake victims?
  1. Parisa Janmohammadi1,
  2. Elnaz Daneshzad2,3,
  3. Tanaz Alipour2,4,
  4. Javad Heshmati5,
  5. Hesam Eshaghi2 and
  6. Khadijeh Mirzaei2
  1. 1 Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran
  2. 2 Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  3. 3 Students' Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran
  4. 4 Department of clinical Psychology, Psychology & Educational Sciences Faculty, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran
  5. 5 Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
  1. Correspondence to Dr Khadijeh Mirzaei, Associate Professor, Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; mirzaei_kh{at}sina.tums.ac.ir

Abstract

Background Diet changes through disasters may affect psychological health as well as general health. The present study aimed to find food security status—that is defined by having enough food for an active, healthy life—dietary patterns and their relationship with probable psychiatric disorders in earthquake survivors.

Methods This cross-sectional study conducted on 350 women who survived in East Azarbaijan earthquake (At 4:53 am on 11 August 2012). Food frequency questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale and food security questionnaire of the US Department of Agriculture were used to assess dietary patterns, psychological and food security status, respectively. P values were considered significant at <0.05.

Results Four major dietary patterns were defined based on factor analysis. These four dietary patterns explained of 37.09% variation of food intakes. Ten per cent of the population was food secure. There was no significant association between tertiles of major dietary patterns and risk of all psychological disorders (p values>0.05).

Conclusion There was no statistically significant association between major dietary patterns and psychiatric disorders. Further well-designed studies need to find any significant association.

  • dietary pattern
  • depressionn
  • food security
  • anxiety
  • earthquake victims
  • adult women
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Footnotes

  • Contributors TA and HE conducted the study. PJ and ED wrote the paper. ED and KM analysed the data. JH checked and commented on the manuscript. Any problem solved by KM who supervised the study.

  • Funding This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (IR.TUMS.VCR.REC.1395.275).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval This study was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences.(IR.TUMS.VCR.REC. 1395. 275)

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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