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Torso body armour coverage defined according to feasibility of haemorrhage control within the prehospital environment: a new paradigm for combat trauma protection
  1. Johno Breeze1,2,
  2. D M Bowley3,
  3. D N Naumann1,
  4. M E R Marsden4,
  5. R N Fryer5,
  6. D Keene6,
  7. A Ramasamy7,8 and
  8. E A Lewis9
  1. 1Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK
  3. 3Surgery, 16 Medical Regiment, Colchester, UK
  4. 4Department of General Surgery, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham, UK
  5. 5Platform Systems, Dstl, Fareham, UK
  6. 6Academic Department of Military Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham, UK
  7. 7The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies, Imperial College London, London, UK
  8. 8Trauma and Orthopaedics, Milton Keynes Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Milton Keynes, UK
  9. 9Defence Equipment and Support, Ministry of Defence Abbey Wood, Bristol, UK
  1. Correspondence to LtCol Johno Breeze, Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham B15 2WB, UK; editor.bmjmilitary{at}bmj.com

Abstract

Developments in military personal armour have aimed to achieve a balance between anatomical coverage, protection and mobility. When death is likely to occur within 60 min of injury to anatomical structures without damage control surgery, then these anatomical structures are defined as ‘essential. However, the medical terminology used to describe coverage is challenging to convey in a Systems Requirements Document (SRD) for acquisition of new armour and to ultimately translate to the correct sizing and fitting of personal armour. Many of those with Ministry of Defence responsible for the procurement of personal armour and thereby using SRDs will likely have limited medical knowledge; therefore, the potentially complex medical terminology used to describe the anatomical boundaries must be translated into easily recognisable and measurable external landmarks. We now propose a complementary classification for ballistic protection coverage, termed threshold and objective, based on the feasibility of haemorrhage control within the prehospital environment.

  • cardiothoracic surgery
  • orthopaedic & trauma surgery
  • thoracic surgery

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @davidnnaumann, @maxmarsden83

  • Contributors All authors were equally involved in the design and preparation of this manuscript. JB takes overall responsibility for it.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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